Book data

Hadrian’s Wall Path
Gordon Simm   Jacquetta Megarry  
11 July 2016
UK price £11.99
64pp, 145 x 220mm, 196g
978-1-898481-43-0

Hadrian’s Wall Path

£11.99

Gordon Simm Jacquetta Megarry

“We welcome this fresh approach, with concise text and fine photographs” - the Trail Manager

Hadrian’s Wall Path runs for 86 miles (138 km) between Bowness-on-Solway and Wallsend (Newcastle) along the line of the Roman Wall completed in AD122 under the Emperor Hadrian. This National Trail crosses northern England from Irish Sea to North Sea and offers many chances to look at the forts, milecastles and interpretation centres within this UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The route is clearly waymarked and well supported by public transport, giving flexibility to walk it in linear sections or as loop walks. Although the book’s detailed description runs from west to east, it also includes notes for east-to-west walkers. For conservation reasons, the Partnership that manages the route asks you to walk the Path only between May and October. Our guidebook was first published in 2011, and revised in 2016 to cover several diversions and various other updates.

Features

This guidebook contains all you need to plan and enjoy Hadrian’s Wall Path:

  • detailed route description for the walk from Bowness to Wallsend
  • concise directions for the walk from Wallsend to Bowness (west-east)
  • the history and anatomy of the Roman Wall
  • summary of forts and visitor centres
  • wildlife, habitats and other background
  • information about public transport and travel
  • lavishly illustrated, with 70 colour photographs
  • map of the entire route (1:100,000)
  • on rainproof paper.
Look inside

Click on the thumbnails below to view sample pages from the book "Hadrian’s Wall Path" in standard PDF format.
To reduce loading time, resolution is limited in these extracts, but all photographs are printed at top quality in our books. All text and images are copyrighted ©Rucksack Readers and licensors: please respect our intellectual property.

Contents
From Part 1 (planning)
2.2 Anatomy of the Wall
3.1 Bowness to Carlisle
Gallery
  • Curlew, iconic bird of Northumberland National Park

    © Andrew Howe| istockphoto.com

  • Cawfields Quarry from Hadrian's Wall Path

    © Gordon Simm

  • Willowford Bridge, Hadrian's Wall Path

    © Gordon Simm

  • Sycamore Gap on the Wall (also known as "Kevin Costner's tree")

    © Gordon Simm

  • Gateshead Millennium Bridge and Newcastle quayside from Hadrian's Wall Path

    © Gordon Simm

  • Temple of Mithras, Hadrian's Wall Path

    © Gordon Simm

Curlew, iconic bird of Northumberland National Park

© Andrew Howe| istockphoto.com

Reviews

From a review in "Walk Northumbria" (Ramblers)

This is a well-balanced book with just about enough historical detail. ... I prefer the west to east direction. ... I like the fact that the book fits into both a standard map case and also a pocket. The photographs are excellent and ... most people reading the book would want to walk the Wall.

Bill Gallon, October 2011 page 6

Reviewed by the Long Distance Walks Association magazine Strider

The guide is profusely illustrated with attractive page layouts that combine text with fine colour photographs and panels on features of interest. There are now a considerable number of guides to Hadrian’s Wall Path, but this one rates highly for its convenience of use, its attractive format, and the clear presentation of the route and other information.

Ken Falconer's review in Strider (page 30)

From a review in Compass Sport magazine, June 2011

I was most impressed by this guide. It has a wealth of information, provided more detail, and filled in more gaps in my knowledge than I thought was possible. It is clearly well researched and basing the guide on a West to East journey is clearly novel, as many start the walk from the East, but does not detract from the benefits whichever direction you choose ... A worthy purchase for anyone interested in Hadrian’s Wall or Roman Britain.

Reviewed by Anthony Barrable, Vol 32, issue 3, p39

Update

If you have the current 2016 printing, this update applies to page 42 bullet 4.

Our wording about visiting the Roman Army Museum would be clearer if we reword bullets 4 and 5 thus:

“Over the top of the hill, turn right along a minor road. The Path follows it for only 100 m before turning left into Walltown Visitor Centre, but keep to the road for a further 100 m to detour to Carvoran Fort and museum on the right: see panel.

Go through Walltown Visitor Centre, bearing left to follow the Path around the lake …”

More info to help with your planning

Support services

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Recommended maps

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