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Cateran Trail

Perfect companion: our thoroughly revised rainproof guidebook with builtin Footprint mapping
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| |-+  Cateran Trail, Perthshire
| | |-+  GPS on the Cateran Trail

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Author Topic: GPS on the Cateran Trail  (Read 14817 times)
andyf
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« on: March 20, 2007, 10:39:11 am »

Hi,
I appreciate that the Cateran Trail is supposed to be well sign posted, and if you have a map of the trail, you should not get lost etc.
My friend and I are planning to walk along the Cateran Trail next week hopefully.

I have purchased a TomTom 6 HP IPAQ PDA for the car. I had an idea that if there was a map that I could download to the PDA, I would then take this item along with me.  From my searches on the Internet, and also I am not sure that even if I could download a map, that the Tomtom would be of any use to me. Therefore unless I hear any other suggestions, I will be leaving my TomTom at home.
Any suggestions or advice would be greatly appreciated.
Regards,

Andyf
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RoyHayward
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« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2007, 07:53:44 pm »

Hi Andy,
Wish you well on the walk you've picked some interesting weather. Definitely leave the Tom Tom at home but take a compass and whistle -- eyes up and see what's round you. I've just bought a couple of Rucksack Readers guides -- Cateran Trail and Rob Roy Way -- wouldn't be without them in planning a walk there's a wealth of info in them, as well as using the Internet of course !! -- it's the additional places of interest and side walks that I like to add on -- GPS only really tells you where you are. The previous feedback has been of great interest especially suggestions on where to stay which in turn is likely to influence time taken to complete -- climbing Mt Blair now looks a certainty with the change in route -- Jaquetta's off-road upgrade card is very comprehensive and a must. Look forward to the report Back Wink
Roy.
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andyf
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« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2007, 06:58:13 am »

Point taken about leaving the GPS at home on this walk.  Would you know if they have a service on this walk where they take your rucksacks from one B&B to the next B&B etc.  I carried everything from the kitchen sink to a flashlight (incorrectly positioned on my back as well) on the West Higland Way walk. The experience nearly killed me. Is there a carrier service that I can contact that will carry the bags?
Regards,
Andyf
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Jacquetta
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« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2007, 08:04:22 am »

Hi Andy

Sorry, but the only baggage services I know of are through Easyways www.easyways.com or Contours, and these are bundled with their booking service (entire holiday in advance).  Easyways uses a local taxi firm Jim Donald 01575-582 324 - thanks to Douglas of Easyways for this phone no.

But what about a different approach, combining travelling light with a halfway resupply point.  Don't leave any safety or weatherproof gear behind (snow, hail and high winds are possible, perhaps likely, next week) but do cut out everything else that isn't vital (especially the kitchen sink Cheesy).  This is mainly a matter of deciding to live more simply for just five days and leaving behind everything that relies on batteries/rechargers, is printed on heavy paper or is an alternative to something that you are already wearing or could easily buy at the next village, such as food.  Since you are taking a car, and the Trail is circular ("leaf on a stem" actually) with modest distances, you could position the car halfway as a resupply point and use a local taxi or bus to get to/from it.  For example, if you leave the car at Spittal of Glenshee at the start, take the A93 back down to Blairgowrie you have then only one overnight before you get back to it to swap stuff around.  After that, you'll know what else you need (if anything) for the final three days.  This is simpler and cheaper than organising daily baggage transfer, as well as kinder to the environment.

You are never more than 7 miles from the nearest village, so how much clobber do you actually need?  OK, I know some folk think they can't live without mountains of gear: I tell them about my acquaintance who says that travelling light means taking three socks: two to wear and one to wash.  It doesn't change their attitudes, but it's worth it for the expressions on their faces Shocked

Good luck and enjoy the Trail but please tell us how you found it idc - Jacquetta
PS to Roy: many thanks for the kind words and you're right about compass and whistle and eyes up: clearly a walker after my own heart!
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Jacquetta Megarry, publisher of Rucksack Readers and forum moderator
andyf
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« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2007, 01:31:27 pm »

Hi Jacquetta and Roy,
                              Thank you both for your good advice above. I need to speak to my friend about the luggage transport problem. I will let you know how I get on after I have completed the route.

Regards,

                AndyF
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